Getting on Brand | Part I

Our brand new series on Branding brought you by a Brand Design Agency in Brisbane

Going back a fair few years (or 30), the term branding referred to the name, slogan, icon, design, logo design or a combination of these elements, that helped businesses distinguish themselves. Much has changed since then. 

Today, branding encapsulates much more. It is now used to describe the outward expression of a brand — how it looks, feels, and speaks to people. Through brand design you can form an identity, build trust and superiority. See, if Superman hadn’t have made a name for himself (and ultimately a great brand), he could’ve easily been perceived as a mad man who didn’t get that you’re meant to wear your underwear, well, underneath your outerwear. 

The way you position your brand through your communications and visual aesthetics is how you connect with your consumers and inspire them to engage with your business — something a good branding agency will achieve through their creative design process.

Why you need a brand and good brand design

Building a brand is what establishes your business’s reputation and lays the foundations for a brighter future. Any brand has three primary functions. Numero uno being to help consumers make a choice when they are navigating the bewildering array of options within the market. The second function is reassurance — brands assure customers that they have made the right choice by effectively communicating the intrinsic value of their business to them. For example, when you receive something via a great packaging design (an extension of the brand), doesn't it feel so much more valuable? Last but not least, brands provide an opportunity for consumers to engage and identify with them through distinctive communication, associations and imagery. 

These functions occur through every single touchpoint, from word of mouth to social media to product packaging design, the opportunity to increase awareness and build customer loyalty exists. These touchpoints are where your brand is reaching consumers and communicating your value, successfully and consistently, forming stronger relationships and efficiently competing with other brands. 

Having a great brand gives your business a purpose and direction, and ultimately your brand is your business and it deserves to have a voice. 

Why you need a brand design strategy 

Rome couldn’t be built in a day and neither can your brand. Great branding takes strategy, patience and sometimes risk. You need to give your brand the time and attention it needs to flourish, much like those plant divas (we’re looking at you, orchids) you have on your desk. A brand design strategy is the best way to begin establishing your brand and streamlining messaging to ensure it is upheld far into the future. 

If you’re sitting here wondering what a brand and brand design strategy even is, simply put, it’s a personalised road map showing you how to get from A (where your business is now) to B (where you want your business to be). Your brand design strategy is a plan that details exactly what your business is trying to achieve and what directions you need to take to achieve it, unifying all behaviour, actions and communications. In short, you need a brand design strategy because without it, you won’t even know where you’re going, so how on Earth can you expect your brand to get there? 

 

Still want to know more? Well lucky for you we’ve got plenty more where that came from and it’ll be revealed in our next installments, where we’ll discuss just what goes into a brand strategy (hint: it includes some heart and identity). 

We won’t stop until your business is on brand and on fleek. So stay tuned, this is a series you don’t want to miss, with a better finale than Game of Thrones (minus the dragons). While you eagerly wait in the meantime, feel free to have a squiz at how we have helped others with their own brand design, product packaging design, and other creative design strategies. 

Or, check out our branding checklist to see if your brand is ticking all the boxes.